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Hoko Knife

A hoko is a simple yet practical knife being easily made in the bush. The first one was found in an archaeological dig near the Hoko river in Washington.

A green stick is used so that the sharp stone flake may be hafted easier. Here, a live branch from a Northern White Cedar is used.

The bark is removed as it makes excellent cordage and will be used to hold the hafted rock flake in place.

Split the stick halfway down

The sharp rock flake is placed between the split portion of the stick

The outer bark is then used as cordage to tie above, below, and across the stick so that the rock flake is held securely.

The hoko is now made and is a great tool for adding control over rock flakes for skinning or wood working with larger flakes.

About Bruce Pandoff

Bruce Pandoff
I live in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. I am a wildland firefighter, wilderness medical first responder, and attended NMU for environmental conservation.I much enjoy practicing primitive skills, researching ancient societies and cultures, and focus a lot of time and energy on studying plants and fungi.